The video showed Tokyo-based ensemble Soemon playing member Brett Larner's arrangement of the Tool song "Lateralus" for six koto and two bass koto. The strings are made from a variety of materials. Originaire de Chine ( gŭzhēng ), il fut introduit au Japon … The modern koto originates from the gakusō used in Japanese court music. The 17-string bass koto (jūshichi-gen) has become more prominent over the years since its development by Michio Miyagi. In March 2010 the koto received widespread international attention when a video linked by the Grammy Award-winning hard rock band Tool on its website became a viral hit. Other solo performers outside Japan include award-winning recording artist Elizabeth Falconer, who also studied for a decade at the Sawai Koto School in Tokyo, and Linda Kako Caplan, Canadian daishihan (grandmaster) and member of Fukuoka's Chikushi Koto School for over two decades. or Best Offer. 17-string koto … The koto (箏) is a Japanese plucked half-tube zither and the national instrument of Japan. Thus the top part is called the "dragon's shell" (竜甲 ryūkō), while the bottom part is called the "dragon's stomach" (竜腹 ryūfuku). For every part of the koto there is a traditional name which connects with the opinion that the body of a koto resembles that of a dragon. The four types of koto (Gakuso, Chikuso, Zokuso, Tagenso) were all created by different subcultures, but also adapted to change the playing style.[2]. (It had twelve strings when it was introduced to Japan in the early Nara period (710–784) and increased to thirteen strings). One end of the koto, noticeable because of the removable colorful fabricshell, is known as the "dragon's head" (竜頭 ryūzu), consisting of parts such as the "dragon's horns" (竜角 ryūkaku - the saddle of the bridge or makurazuno 枕角), "dragon's tongue" (竜舌 ryūzetsu), "dragon's eyes" (竜眼 ryūgan - the holes for the strings) and "dragon's forehead" (竜額 ryūgaku - the space above the makurazuno). Oxford Art Online. July 30, 2008. The members of the band Rin' are popular jūshichi-gen players in the modern music scene. In November 2011, worldwide audiences were further exposed to the koto when she performed with Shakira at the Latin Grammy Awards. June Kuramoto of the jazz fusion group Hiroshima was one of the first koto performers to popularize the koto in a non-traditional fusion style. When a small bridge is unavailable for some very low notes, some players may, as an emergency measure, use a bridge upside down. Bridges have been known to break during playing, and with some older instruments which have the surface where the bridges rest being worn due to much use, the bridges may fall during playing, especially when pressing strings. Kimio Eto est un interprète moderne. When the koto was first imported to Japan, the native word koto was a generic term for any and all Japanese stringed instruments. Borrowed from Sranan Tongo koto, from English coat. Strings can be tightened by a special machine, but often are tightened by hand, and then tied. The modern koto originates from the gakusō used in Japanese court music. The most common type uses 13 strings strung over movable bridges used for tuning, different pieces possibly requiring different tuning. 13-stringed koto performance of the song "Sakura Sakura", "sian Instrument Collection in the Beckwith Music Library", "Contemporary Music for Japanese Instruments: Sawai Koto Ensemble", "Reiko Obata Performs with Orchestra Nova on KPBS", "Sukiyaki by A Taste of Honey on Soul Train", "I'll Try Something New by A Taste of Honey on Soul Train". Yukiko Matsuyama leads her KotoYuki band in Los Angeles. Miyagi is largely regarded as being responsible for keeping the koto alive when traditional Japanese arts were being forgotten and replaced by Westernization. Le koto est une longue cithare (en forme de dragon tapi), mesurant environ 1,80 m de long et comptant 13 cordes. She performed on the Grammy-winning album Miho: Journey to the Mountain (2010) by the Paul Winter Consort, garnering additional exposure to Western audiences for the instrument. Koto may or may not be adorned. Le koto (琴 en japonais) est un instrument de musique à cordes pincées utilisé en musique japonaise traditionnelle, notamment dans le kabuki et le bunraku. Koto, also called kin, long Japanese board zither having 13 silk strings and movable bridges. The wood is also cut into two patterns, itame (also called mokume), which has a swirling pattern, or straight lined masame. Michio Miyagi (1894–1956), a blind composer, innovator, and performer, is considered to have been the first Japanese composer to combine western music and traditional koto music. Silk strings are still made, and are usually yellow in color. The strings are made from a variety of materials. Over time the definition of koto could not describe the wide variety of these stringed instruments and so the meanings changed. Print. Joueurs et joueuses de koto pincent les cordes avec des onglets ajustés aux doigts de la main droite. Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary, Trésor de la langue française informatisé, https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=koto&oldid=61104743, Finnish terms inherited from Proto-Finnic, Madurese terms inherited from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian, Madurese terms derived from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian, Madurese terms inherited from Proto-Austronesian, Madurese terms derived from Proto-Austronesian, Sranan Tongo terms with IPA pronunciation, Requests for translations into Vietnamese, Requests for etymologies in Votic entries, Requests for inflections in Votic entries, Requests for inflections in Votic noun entries, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. Sawai's widow Kazue Sawai, who as a child was Miyagi's favored disciple, has been the largest driving force behind the internationalization and modernization of the koto. [5] This variety of instrument came in two basic forms, a zither that had bridges and zithers without bridges. The koto (箏) is a Japanese plucked half-tube zither and the national instrument of Japan. Grove Art Online. The body of the instrument is made of paulownia wood and is about 190 cm (74 inches) long. Of course, such an arrangement is unstable, and the bridge would have a tendency to fall down. This article was most recently revised and updated by, Grinnell College Musical Instrument Collection - Koto, The Metropolitan Museum of Art - The Barbizon School: French Painters of Nature, koto, or kin - Student Encyclopedia (Ages 11 and up). Dean McNeill also prominently features a synthesized koto. Perhaps the most important influence on the development of koto was Yatsuhashi Kengyo (1614–1685). Au Japon, pendant plus de 2 siècles, seuls les aveugles avaient le droit de devenir joueurs professionnels de koto. The influence of Western pop music has made the koto less prominent in Japan, although it is still developing as an instrument. In classical music, what would you call a woman with a very high singing voice? Originaire de Chine (gŭzhēng), il fut introduit au Japon entre le VIIe et le VIIIe siècle et était joué principalement à la Cour impériale ; l'usage s'en est ensuite démocratisé. Le jūshichigen a été créé par Miyagi : cet instrument est maintenant populaire. The bridges (Ji) used to be made of ivory, but nowadays are typically made of plastic, and occasionally made of wood. The four types of koto (Gakuso, Chikuso, Zokuso, Tagenso) were all created by different subcultures, but also adapted to change the playing style.[2]. See more ideas about Japanese traditional, Japan, Japanese. Schools for the bourgeois were established in the 16th century. He performed abroad and by 1928 his piece for koto and shakuhachi, Haru no Umi (Spring Sea) had been transcribed for numerous instruments. See more ideas about Japanese, Japanese traditional, Japanese culture. The rock band Queen used a (toy) koto in "The Prophet's Song" on their 1975 album A Night at the Opera. The video showed Tokyo-based ensemble Soemon playing member Brett Larner's arrangement of the Tool song "Lateralus" for six koto and two bass koto. The person who plays…. Various pentatonic tunings are used, depending on the type of music being played. The most common type uses 13 strings strung over movable bridges used for tuning, different pieces possibly requiring different tuning. Adornments include inlays of ivory and ebony, tortoise shell, metal figures, etc. The Japanese koto belongs to the Asian zither family that also comprises the Chinese zheng (ancestral to the other zithers in the family), the Korean gayageum, and the Vietnamese dan tranh. Bridges have been known to break during playing, and with some older instruments which have the surface where the bridges rest being worn due to much use, the bridges may fall during playing, especially when pressing strings. It is derived from the Chinese zheng and se, and similar to the Mongolian yatga, the Korean gayageum and ajaeng, the Vietnamese đàn tranh, the Sundanese kacapi and the Kazakhstan jetigen. Articles from Britannica Encyclopedias for elementary and high school students. Pour l’article ayant un titre homophone, voir, https://fr.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Koto&oldid=171583227, Article manquant de références depuis septembre 2010, Article manquant de références/Liste complète, Catégorie Commons avec lien local identique sur Wikidata, Page pointant vers des bases relatives à la musique, licence Creative Commons attribution, partage dans les mêmes conditions, comment citer les auteurs et mentionner la licence. From Proto-Finnic *koto, which is derived from Proto-Finnic *kota. The makura ito was used in paper so the fine silk was in abundance in Japan. One end of the koto, noticeable because of the removable colorful fabricshell, is known as the "dragon's head" (竜頭 ryūzu), consisting of parts such as the "dragon's horns" (竜角 ryūkaku - the saddle of the bridge or makurazuno 枕角), "dragon's tongue" (竜舌 ryūzetsu), "dragon's eyes" (竜眼 ryūgan - the holes for the strings) and "dragon's forehead" (竜額 ryūgaku - the space above the makurazuno). Perhaps the most important influence on the development of koto was Yatsuhashi Kengyo (1614–1685). Miyagi is largely regarded as being responsible for keeping the koto alive when traditional Japanese arts were being forgotten and replaced by Westernization. Over time the definition of koto could not describe the wide variety of these stringed instruments and so the meanings changed. Obata also produced the first-ever English language koto instructional DVD, titled "You Can Play Koto." Koto are about 180 centimetres length, and made from kiri wood. There are, of course, various sorts of patch materials sold to fill the holes which cause the legs of a bridge to rest on an unstable area. In older pop and rock music, David Bowie used a koto in the instrumental piece "Moss Garden" on his album "Heroes" (1977). About six feet long and one foot wide, the koto is traditionally placed on the floor in front of the player, who kneels.[13]. The Koto: A Traditional Instrument in Contemporary Japan, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Koto_(instrument)&oldid=984939200, Articles containing Chinese-language text, Articles containing Mongolian-language text, Articles containing Vietnamese-language text, Articles containing Japanese-language text, Wikipedia articles with MusicBrainz instrument identifiers, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, The Kumiuta and Danmono Traditions of Japanese Koto Music, by Willem Adriaansz (University of California Press, 1973), This page was last edited on 23 October 2020, at 00:28. Around the 1920s, Goro Morita created a new version of the two-stringed koto; on this koto, one would push down buttons above the metal strings like the western autoharp. Her arrangement of composer John Cage's prepared piano duet "Three Dances" for four prepared bass koto was a landmark in the modern era of koto music. Il existait aussi le hachijūgen (80 cordes) créé par Miyagi, mais il n'a jamais existé qu'un seul exemplaire de cet instrument et personne n'en joue aujourd'hui. A 2020 acoustic cover of Led Zeppelin's Battle of Evermore by PianoRock feat. This feature was not seen on the speculated nobility style instruments because they used a more tension of theirs and valued the relict nature of their instruments. Silk strings are still made, and are usually yellow in color. Her arrangement of composer John Cage's prepared piano duet "Three Dances" for four prepared bass koto was a landmark in the modern era of koto music.
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